Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Statement by Mr. Enayet Madani Counselor of the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations During General Debate of Second Committee of the 65th General Assembly

Madame Chair,

As I take the floor for the first time, let me congratulate your Excellency on behalf of my delegation for your election as the Chair of the Second Committee. My delegation is confident that the important work of Second Committee under your wise and able leadership will be fruitful and successful during the General Assembly’s 65th Session. I take this opportunity to express our thanks to your predecessor for his excellent work. I also extend my congratulations to members of the Bureau for their election and assure you and the Bureau of our full cooperation.

I would like to express my support to the statement delivered by the delegation of Yemen on behalf of G-77 and China. As well I would like to affiliate myself with statements delivered by the delegations of Nepal and Pargway on behalf of LDCs and LLDCs.

Madam Chair,

Second Committee will deal with a large number of important issues, my delegation stress on the following issues to be addressed by the second committee:

Not longtime ago the world leaders in New York gathered to review the achievements and challenges of MDGs. At the time of the Millennium Declaration’s adoption in 2000, Afghanistan was cut off, isolated from the international community by the Taliban regime, which denied Afghan people even the most fundamental human rights and allowed terrorists to use Afghan soil to launch attacks around the world.  In 2001, with the overthrow of the Taliban regime, Afghanistan slowly began to rebuild its shattered political, economic and social structures, and regained its rightful place in the community of nations.  Our country undertook a series of policies aimed at a comprehensive reconstruction and stabilization of the political and economic situation both nationally and regionally. These policies centered on the urgent need to bring the Afghan people out of grinding poverty and provide them with the basic human rights, opportunities and services that had been denied them for decades.

In 2004, Afghanistan was able to join the rest of the international community in committing to a series of time-bound Development Goals. Because we were late in joining the MDGs, our targets were set to be achieved by 2020.  Therefore, we consider that those countries that are behind others in achieving their MDGs should be dully considered by the second committee.

Afghanistan, strongly believes that United Nation can play a very important role in helping developing countries and particularly LDCs including those countries emerging from conflict in achieving their MDGs.

My delegation, believes that the issues related to ongoing financial and economic crisis have enormous impact on development agenda of the developing and particularly the least developed countries, therefore, deserve to be addressed seriously.

My delegation, stress that the second committee to take into consideration some of the world’s most difficult and pressing development issues, including poverty eradication, fight against hunger, disease, environmental degradation, and the promotion of gender equality, education and health.

Afghanistan believes that poverty reduction can only be achieved through effective cooperation among all stakeholders. It also requires a resolute commitment on the part of both developed and developing countries for increased cooperation. In that regard, Afghanistan underscores the need for continued international support – in the form of financial and technical assistance – for developing countries.  The past years have seen a reduction in Official Development Assistance (ODA).  More needs to be done to prevent this trend.

By the same token, more needs to be done for ensuring effective utilization of official development assistance.  Donor countries should consider channeling greater portions of development assistance through the core national budgets of developing countries.  In short, national ownership of development priorities among developing countries is of paramount importance.

As more than 80% of population in my country depend on agriculture for their livelihood, thus we emphasis on matters related to agriculture development and food security to be addressed by the Second Committee.

Madam Chair,

Afghanistan has made enormous strides in the past decade, emerging from the ruins of war to build a more functioning government, a more prosperous economy, and a more healthy society. However, the complex issue of security remains as a big impediment for the government to implement its development policies, therefore we consider that the issue of security and its impact on development of post conflict countries to be given due consideration by the second committee.

I thank you.

Agriculture development and food security

Statement delivered by, Mr. Enayet Madani, Counsellor

At the Second Committee

Debate on Agenda Item 60: Agriculture development and food security
on behalf of H.E. Zahir Tanin


Mr. Chairman,

I would first like to thank you for convening this meeting, and align myself with the statement delivered by distinguished delegate of Sudan on behalf of the G77 and China my delegation as well voice a support for the statement delivered by distinguished representative of Nepal on behalf of LDCs I take this opportunity to thank the UN secretary General for his report on agriculture development and food security. I would also like to thank the UN system, and particularly the World Food Programme and the Food and Agriculture Organization for their continued aid and support to Afghanistan. We also appreciate their efforts in research and development, as well as technical assistance on global agriculture and food security.

We welcome the recent L’Aquila Initiative on Global Food Security which both prioritizes the urgency of addressing food security, agriculture, and food price trends in developing countries, such as Afghanistan, and acknowledges the importance of continued financial and technical assistance. We recognize and are thankful to those who have taken the lead to keep food security challenges at the top of the global agenda.

Afghanistan once had a very abundant and robust agricultural economy and was a self-sufficient producer of wheat, fruits, nuts, barley, sugarcane, and wool, before conflict engulfed the country. Today, our agricultural productivity has significantly declined, necessary physical infrastructure has been destroyed, and droughts and price fluctuations have created food shortages and left millions of Afghans starving. It is of the utmost importance that we restore our agricultural sector to what is once was, while also ensuring its sustainability by adapting to new environmental and political circumstances.

Although only 12% of Afghanistan’s land is fertile for agriculture, eighty percent of our country’s population lives in rural areas and is dependent on sustenance farming for survival and livelihood. Furthermore, agriculture accounts for half of Afghanistan’s Gross Domestic Product and thus is closely linked to our economic growth. However, war has left much of our population, particularly farmers, dependent on international assistance. Thus, it is vital to continue humanitarian assistance and create food safety nets for those most vulnerable, while at the same time re-structuring and investing in our agricultural sector so self-sufficiency can be achieved.

Mr. Chairman

In the past few years, we have experienced some of the worst droughts in Afghanistan’s history. In 2008 and 2009, droughts led to a 60% reduction in wheat production from the previous year. Increasing water scarcity affects both rain-fed and irrigated lands. While 40% of the sector has irrigation systems, many of these irrigation systems were largely destroyed during the past few decades of war. More pressing, 85% of our irrigated land is dependent on water from the mountains, which are sensitive to climate change and shifting rainfall patterns.

As a result of conflict and draught, malnutrition in Afghanistan is a growing problem. An average of 50% of children under 3 are moderately or severely stunted from poor nutrition, and 80-90% of households are considered to have very poor dietary diversity. This prohibits us from achieving the first Millennium Development Goal without substantial efforts to restructure of our agricultural sector with the support of the international community.

Mr. Chairman,

Small farmers and women, those who are most vulnerable to political and economic instability, must be at the center of our food and agriculture policy. Women bear the responsibility of providing food and nutrition to the family, and are critical to successfully tackling food security issues. Farmers, particularly small landowners must have access to financing and technology, so agriculture can be a viable source of their livelihoods. Farmers, civil society groups, and the government all play a vital role in ensuring these plans are implemented.

To re-build Afghanistan’s agricultural sector, and ensure food security, several key steps are necessary:

First, we need to improve our agricultural productivity without succumbing to wasteful or unsustainable agricultural practices. This includes improving water conservation and minimizing soil and ecosystem degradation. Food security can only occur with sustainable usage of water and natural resources.

Second, Afghanistan’s agriculture sector demands more research on and funding for drought resistant crops and seed varieties to build our resiliency against climate change and volatile price fluctuations. Technology transfer can play a role in achieving this.

Third, our infrastructure must be re-built, with the support of the international community. Rehabilitation of water wells, reservoirs, and irrigation technologies is a first step in re-building our physical systems. This will also ensure socioeconomic development as it has also been found that poverty rates tend to be higher in areas lacking irrigation, demonstrating the strong connection between agriculture and Afghan livelihoods.

Fourth, policies for food pricing should be established. In the beginning of 2008, FAO index of prices spiked, increasing by 40% and leading to severe food shortages in Afghanistan. High food prices and corresponding food shortages require emergency food assistance. Safety nets during these times must be established so the most vulnerable sectors of our society do not suffer the fallouts of unstable food and financial markets

Mr. Chairman

As the reconstruction of Afghanistan continues, we see an enormous opportunity to secure our food resources and restore our position as a self-sufficient agricultural producer. Reducing hunger and stabilizing our food security is closely tied with women’s rights, poverty alleviation, and economic growth. We also see the opportunity to increase Afghan farmers’ capability to adapt agricultural practices in response to climate change and economic conditions. We ask the World Food Programme, USDA, FAO and other funders continue aiding us in overcoming the obstacles Afghanistan faces, and for the international community as a whole to continue supporting and collaborating with us on achieving food security.

Thank you Mr. Chairman.