Saturday, February 13, 2016

H.E Hamid Karzai President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan At the Third Summit of the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA)

June 08, 2010, Istanbul

Mr. President,

Excellencies,

Distinguished Delegates,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

السلام علیکم و رحمت الله و برکاته

I would like to thank the government and people of Turkey for their warm reception and kind hospitality that have always made our visits to Turkey memorable. I am delighted to join the Third Summit of the Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia, and to convey the warm greetings of the people of Afghanistan.

I take this opportunity again to condemn the Israeli commando attack against efforts to bring humanitarian relief assistance to the besieged people of Gaza. I wish to express our deep condolences for the loss of life and injury to the government and people of Turkey resulting from this violent act. There is no doubt that such acts of violence blatantly trample respect for human dignity and undermine peaceful co-existence.

Earlier this year, Turkey’s initiative to host “the Summit on Friendship and Cooperation in the Heart of Asia”, focusing on Afghanistan’s security and development challenges, provided a clear example of Turkey’s dedication towards safeguarding peace and stability in our region. In assuming the Chairmanship of CICA, and hosting this Summit, Turkey once again displays its solid commitment to promoting mutual trust through dialogue, and to cementing strategic ties among Asian nations through confidence-building measures. I am convinced that under Turkey’s auspices, CICA will continue to be an effective platform for comprehensive engagement and cooperation across the region.

In June 2002, by signing the landmark Almaty Declaration, we committed to work in partnership to make Asia a common area of security, prosperity, and peaceful co-existence. Today, our commitment remains as strong as ever.

CICA was born due to the vision and efforts of His Excellency President Nursultan Nazarbayev. I commend President Nazarbayev for his visionary far-sightedness. I believe that CICA will be a long-lasting testimony to President Nazarbayev’s desire for comprehensive peace and security in our continent. As Kazakhstan assumes the chairmanship of the OSCE, we wish President Nazarbayev continued success in his mission for peace and security.

Afghanistan is delighted that CICA has grown in size and diversity. In this regard, we welcome the Socialist Republic of Vietnam and the Republic of Iraq as CICA’s newest members. We also welcome the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the People’s Republic of Bangladesh as observers in this forum. Their participation in CICA will certainly enrich our dialogue, and give added impetus to our efforts for peace, security and mutual understanding.

Given the importance of CICA, Afghanistan is encouraged by the expansion of its collaboration with other regional and international bodies and institutions. We welcome, in particular, the establishment of the UN Regional Center for Preventive Diplomacy in Ashqabad.

Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Factors endangering security in Asia are multifaceted, with terrorism, extremism, proliferation of nuclear weapons, trans- national organized crime, and illicit drugs as the most troubling problems.

Events across the globe clearly show that threats posed by terrorism and extremism are not specific to any one country. From Moscow to New York, from Istanbul to Mumbai, and from Kabul to Lahore, extremists and terrorists have killed, maimed, and created a climate of fear among millions of innocent citizens.

Terrorism should not be identified with any specific nationality or religion; neither should the fight against terrorism be subject to double standards. Without condition or reservation, we must all resolutely condemn and fight terrorism whenever and wherever it occurs, whoever it is directed against and in whatever form it appears.

Excellencies,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Over the years, terrorism, trans-national organized crime, and illicit drugs have become interlinked, thus aggravating the threats to our common security. In response, we must make concerted efforts to expand our cooperation in interdiction, intelligence exchange, security consultations and training, as well as efficient border management.

For Afghanistan, the problem of narcotics production and trafficking is a by-product of three decades of conflict. Countering this problem requires time, patience, and most importantly, enhanced collaboration between transit- and consuming countries.

Excellencies,

The potential for economic growth in our region is enormous. Enhanced and effective cooperation in key fields such as trade, transit, transportation and energy would exponentially contribute to maintaining a virtuous cycle of peace and development in Asia. To this end, Afghanistan is actively working to regain its historic role as a land-bridge connecting south and central Asia with the Middle East. We are looking forward to the implementation of the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) pipeline for energy transportation to Pakistan and India via Afghanistan. We also look forward to the realization of the Central Asia-South Asia Regional Electricity Market Initiative (CASA 1000).

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The people of Afghanistan appreciate the support of our friends in Asia and beyond in helping us to safeguard our security, territorial integrity, and stability. A stable and prosperous Afghanistan can contribute tremendously to the cause of stability and prosperity in our continent.

To achieve stability and prosperity in Afghanistan, we need enduring peace. Just a few days ago we held a Grand Consultative Assembly aimed at promoting dialogue and consensus-building required for achieving enduring peace. The events of the Grand Assembly fully displayed the unity of purpose and the desire of the Afghan nation for peace.

The participants of the Grand Peace Jirga gave strong recognition to the role that our brotherly Islamic nations can play in peace efforts in our country. They, with gratitude called upon the Custodian of Huramain and Sharifian, His Majesty King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia to continue to support Afghanistan’s efforts for peace and reconciliation. The Grand Assembly also expressed great appreciation to Turkey for facilitating the tripartite dialogue with Pakistan and invited its continued support in this regard.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Excellencies,

Our gathering today is witness to the fact that we are united by common goals to safeguard peace and stability in our continent, and to ensure our peoples’ security, well-being, and dignity. These common goals constitute the corner-stone of our mutual identity.

Let’s build our future on the foundation of this mutual identity with optimism, energy, and confidence.

Thank You.

Closing Remarks by H.E. Zahir Tanin, Chair of Intergovernmental Negotiations on Security Council Reform

CLOSING REMARKS BY

H.E. ZAHIR TANIN

PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF AFGHANISTAN

TO THE UNITED NATIONS IN NEW YORK

CHAIR OF THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS

ON THE QUESTION OF EQUITABLE REPRESENTATION AND INCREASE IN THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED TO THE COUNCIL

AT AN INFORMAL PLENARY SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

3 JUNE 2010

UNITED NATIONS HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK

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Excellencies, distinguished delegates,

Let me close this meeting by first and foremost thanking all delegations for their active participation and continuing engagement in this process. Let me also thank all Member States for their kind words of support thus far. I have been deeply heartened by the numerous expressions of good faith, and it is abundantly clear to me today that you, the membership, remain as determined as ever to reform the Security Council.

In this regard, I am pleased to note the membership-wide agreement in this room that the text with its annexes, currently in front of you, is a helpful vehicle to continue to move this process forward in accordance with decisions 62/557 and 63/565. This text, revision 1, is as you know a product of your persistent and unanimous calls for text-based negotiations, and could not have been made without your contributions, as these of course constitute the very foundation of our negotiations. However, with everything we have going for us, in our continual quest for reform, we cannot afford to grow complacent. We must now build on the framework that you so meticulously have put together. This is the sense of the house.

As is customary, and as a logical result of yesterday and today’s deliberations, it is therefore my intention to convene a series of meetings of the informal plenary to allow Member States to focus on the text at hand in an open, transparent, comprehensive and inclusive manner. These meetings will be scheduled in accordance with the five interconnected key issues as laid out by decision 62/557, beginning, this time, in reverse order and as a working necessity, only with a meeting dedicated to the section of the text on the fifth key issue concerning the relationship between the General Assembly and the Security Council on 11 June. This meeting will of course be followed by individual meetings on the rest of the five key issues. I believe that this structure will allow the text to continue to evolve in a fair, balanced, comprehensive and open membership-driven way.

I would like to stress that Member States are as always welcome to comment on any matter they deem relevant. However, rather than restating known positions at the meetings devoted to the specific key issues, I encourage all of you to look concretely and comprehensively at the text with a view to making specific amendments that would reduce obvious overlaps, address existing differences and combine common elements in the language of the negotiation text. For my part, and as is customary, I will continue to discharge my responsibility as Chair by reflecting all suggested amendments by Member States in coming versions of the text. Amendments will, however, only be applied with the agreement of the Member State, -or States, whose language is affected as is usual practice in this house when we negotiate. On this note, Member States are of course always encouraged to deliberate amongst each other and convey any results thereof to me either during our meetings or through a letter. You are, and will remain, the masters of your own positions, but only if you reach across the aisle in a spirit of compromise and good faith can this process move forward. Don’t just ask what the text can do for you, but also what you can do for the text.

On this note, I urge you to bring the same kind of engagement and determination to the next exchanges as you have shown in the previous rounds. The task at hand deserves it. Let me remind all of you that we continue to meet in an informal setting. This should mean brief interventions rather than prepared statements, and interaction. I will certainly encourage that to the best of my abilities. Let me also clarify, that an individual meeting could go on for longer than one day, so that we do justice to the scope of every single issue.

Again, thank you all for your participation and engagement in this process. I am confident that, together, we will continue to move forward towards a solution that can garner the widest possible acceptance.

Thank you.

Opening Remarks by H.E. Zahir Tanin, Chair of Intergovernmental Negotiations on Security Council Reform

INTERVENTION BY

H.E. ZAHIR TANIN

PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF AFGHANISTAN

TO THE UNITED NATIONS IN NEW YORK

CHAIR OF THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS

ON THE QUESTION OF EQUITABLE REPRESENTATION AND INCREASE IN THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED TO THE COUNCIL

AT AN INFORMAL PLENARY SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

2 JUNE 2010

UNITED NATIONS HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK

Check against delivery

Excellencies, distinguished delegates,

Welcome to the first meeting of the fifth round of intergovernmental negotiations, and welcome to the first meetings in these new, temporary facilities. Hopefully, once we leave this building to move back into renovated conference rooms, one chamber in particular, we all know which one, will also have undergone some changes. For my part, I have no doubt that we will succeed, as I have personally been witness to the journey that you, the Member States, have taken since these negotiations began in February 2009.

Together, and in accordance with the modus operandi collectively embraced by Member States during the 19 February 2009 launch of the intergovernmental negotiations, we have held four exhaustive rounds of negotiations. During this time, you, the membership, have increasingly assumed responsibility for the negotiations process, aided, of course, by consensus decisions 62/577 and 63/565, our brightly shining lodestars, as well as a fully-invested President, and a body of work, including my letters and statements. But it is first and foremost you, the membership, and your burning desire to reform the Council that keeps us moving forward.

And as you recognized during our last meeting in January, no solution has ever appeared without a paper trail. Member States all united behind a call to move to text-based negotiations as the next step in the strict and good faith implementation of our negotiation mandate. As Chair, I of course complied with this universal request. Through a transparent and open process, in which I made myself available to any Member States or group thereof, I assumed my responsibility as Chair and produced an all-encompassing text, compiled in strict conformity with decision 62/557, which places your positions and proposals and the five key issues at the heart of these negotiations. The text, which reflects my enduring commitment to the principles of inclusiveness and transparency, consists of excerpts from the positions submitted by Member States, structured according to the five key issues, with an annex that includes these positions in their entirety. These are your words, and this is your text.

What you have before you today is the first revision, which incorporates the changes to the text that you, the Member States, requested before the 20 May deadline. To galvanize the negotiations on this text in an open, comprehensive, inclusive, and transparent way, I indicated in my letter of 10 May that the rest of the fifth round will be structured around concrete text-based negotiations on each of the five key issues as reflected in the text, during which Member States are encouraged to undertake more informal drafting exercises, merging language to reduce the obvious overlaps and finding language to bridge differences, while continuing to improve the negotiation text. I, as your Chair partial to progress, but impartial to any of the positions, will assist you in this endeavor, but it is up to you, the membership, to continue to create the positive momentum needed to move this process forward.

In so doing, we are following the custom of the house, and the desire of the membership to move forward. This means that Member States are the masters of their own positions, and that the text, which naturally remains open, will only evolve towards a higher degree of concreteness through increased creativity, flexibility and compromise on the part of Member States. I believe that this structure will allow the process to continue to progress in a fair, balanced and comprehensive membership-driven way in the pursuit of a solution that can garner the widest possible political acceptance by Member States.

I now open the floor for any comments. Thank you