Friday, November 27, 2015

Archives for 2013

Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism

Statement of The Islamic of Republic of Afghanistan Delivered by Mohammad Taqi Khalili Deputy Permanent Representative of Afghanistan to the UN
At the Sixth Committee (68th UNGA) on Agenda Item:110  Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism

Mohammad Taqi KhaliliThank you Mr. Chairman,

We join other delegations in congratulating you on your election to the Chairmanship of the Sixth Committee. We look forward to working closely with you in the way forward, and assure you of our full support and cooperation.

We align ourselves with the statements delivered on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation, and the Non-Aligned Movement.

Afghanistan condemns terrorism in all its forms and manifestations. By now, we all are convinced this evil phenomenon is global in nature, and to be defeated, requires a concerted and unified approach.

Mr. Chairman,

Afghanistan continues to be one of the main victims of terrorism. Despite the major transformation in Afghan society towards democratization, substantial improvements in the health and education sectors, the building of our infrastructure, and advances in fundamental freedoms and liberties, our people still suffer from the horror of terrorism. The evil desire of terrorists to prevent our success, a peaceful and stable Afghanistan, has yet to be abandoned.

Nevertheless, our commitment to defeating this scourge at the national, regional and international level is as strong as ever. Our counter-terrorism approach constitutes a core pillar of our national security strategy. Through the security transition, our security forces have taken charge of security responsibilities throughout the country. Our national army and police are in the front line of all counter-terrorism operations. In this respect, scores of terrorists and enemy combatants have been killed, captured and brought to justice. Moreover, hundreds of terrorist plots were averted in various parts of the country.

Our people have suffered immensely in terms of human and material loss. We have lost thousands of our soldiers and officers in our struggle against terrorism. And many more were maimed and wounded. In our pursuit of a lasting peace in our country, our counter-terrorism efforts will continue unabated.

Having said that, we hope to see concrete efforts for the elimination of terrorist sanctuaries and support centers located outside Afghanistan, which represent the main source of the violence and terror in our country.

Experience has shown that our region is particularly prone to the menace of terrorism. We in Afghanistan see regional cooperation to be a necessity to rooting out terrorism in our part of the world. In this respect, we are working closely with our immediate and distant neighbors, bilaterally, trilaterally and through other initiatives, such as the Istanbul Process.

We are encouraged by the outcome of President Karzai’s recent visit to Pakistan, where detailed discussions were held on enhancing joint efforts to defeat terrorism, and advance our Afghan-led peace and reconciliation process.

Mr. Chairman,

The dangerous link between terrorism and organized crime remains a serious concern to Afghanistan. These two perils are mutually reinforcing, and must be given equal attention. In this regard, we emphasize that the problem of narcotic drugs can only be effectively addressed through a comprehensive and holistic approach, dealing with all aspects of the problem – production, trafficking and consumption. We highlight, in this respect, enhanced efforts at the regional level to curtail trafficking. This will be essential to defeating the drug problem.

Mr. Chairman,

All States are obligated to fulfill their responsibility to combat international terrorism. In this respect, we underscore full compliance with, and implementation of relevant General Assembly and Security Council resolutions. These include the Declaration on Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism, adopted by UN General Assembly resolution 49/60, and Security Council resolution 1373, which call on states to refrain from providing support and assistance to terrorists.

We continue to adjust our national counter-terrorism legislation, to correspond with international legal frameworks to combat terrorism. We commend the important work being done by the Counter-Terrorism Prevention Branch of UNODC. Our national counter-terrorism practitioners are taking part in a number of counter-terrorism workshops and seminars, focusing on capacity-building. We are steadily strengthening our capacity, and working to implement the 13 international conventions and protocols dealing with terrorism, to which we are party.

Mr. Chairman,

We fully support the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, representing the overall framework for international efforts to defeat terrorism. We welcome the outcome of the 3rd Review in June of last year, and look forward to the 4th review. We concur with the assessment that the Strategy should be implemented in a balanced manner, with due consideration to all 4 pillars.

The work of the counter-terrorism committees 1267/1989, 1373 and 1540 are at the center of the Security Council counter-terrorism focus. For our part, we have increased inter-agency coordination, to ensure consistent reporting on implementation to relevant Security Council committees.

Mr. Chairman,

The creation of the International Center for Countering Terrorism was a milestone, helping to enhance counter-terrorism cooperation, and strengthen capacity in States, both of which are essential for the implementation of Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. We are of the view the UN will best be able to lead international counter-terrorism efforts by way of increased coordination and coherence among relevant UN agencies. In this respect, we applaud the work being done by the Counter-terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF).

We echo the call of other speakers in highlighting the need to achieve the early conclusion of the Comprehensive Convention for Combating International Terrorism. We commend the work being done by the Ad-Hoc Committee established by General Assembly Resolution 51/210 of 17

December 1996. We must look forward, and work to resolve, outstanding issues causing the impasse in negotiations.

I Thank You.

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon meets with H.E. Zalmai Rassoul

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right) meets with H.E. Zalmai Rassoul, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Afghanistan

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right) meets with H.E. Zalmai Rassoul, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Afghanistan

Intervention BY H.E. Dr. Zahir Tanin Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations 12th Annual Meeting of Foreign Ministers of Landlocked Developing Countries

Mr. Chairman,

At the outset, my delegation appreciates the theme for this year’s Meeting of Foreign Ministers of the Landlocked Developing Countries: “Building Genuine Partnerships for Overcoming Impacts of Landlockedeness in the context of Sustainable Development”. We believe that overcoming the challenge of landlockedness is very much reliant on the spirit of partnership and cooperation, in particular between landlocked and transit developing countries, which are crucial to the achievement of our sustainable development objectives.

Towards building and enhancing genuine partnerships for overcoming the impacts of landlockness, regional cooperation is essential and provides opportunities to optimally utilize the resources of the region for the benefit of all the countries and will bring down all barriers and create borders with human face. Afghanistan is part of many regional and sub-regional initiatives, programs and processes and has the potential to contribute more in better connectivity of the entire region.

The “Istanbul Process on Regional Security and Cooperation for a Secure and Stable Afghanistan” launched on 2 November 2011 to enhance stability and regional cooperation between Afghanistan and 15 participating countries, among them 5 are Landlocked Developing Countries. There are 21 confidence-building measures (CBMs) under the Istanbul process that are economic in nature (for example, trade, transport infrastructure, energy, water management, agriculture, and private investment). For each of these priority CBMs, a participating country has the leading role.

Afghanistan, by availing its unique geographic position, is now transforming from a landlocked to a land-linked country by connecting energy rich Central Asia to the energy deficient South Asia. Improved transportation links via the development of road corridors to the south and energy exports from landlocked Central Asian countries to the South Asia via Afghanistan would offer alternative means of trade flows and benefit the entire region.

There are a number of sub-regional transit, transport and energy projects under development via Afghanistan, such as Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) gas pipeline project, CASA 1000 for electricity supply from Kyrgyz Republic and Tajikistan to Afghanistan and Pakistan and more recently, a trilateral agreement on railway project between Tajikistan-Afghanistan and Turkmenistan has been signed between the three neighboring countries.

In addition to the geographical handicaps and remoteness to world markets, high transport costs affect the competitiveness margin of landlocked developing countries, in particular least developed countries among them and thereby affect trade volume. There is a clear connection between distance and transport costs. As per the World Bank’s data, Afghanistan faces highest cost of exporting at $3545 per container in 2012 compared to $2230 for Bhutan and $1960 for Nepal. In this context, lowering of trade and transit costs and time among the landlocked countries would enhance the pace of economic development; significantly increase incomes, employment and consumption in the region leading to reduction of incidence of poverty levels that will help LLDCs to diminish their disadvantage, and remain better connected to the world.

Foreign trade between Afghanistan and its neighbors is very important and can contribute to economic growth and jobs creation even if long distance trade transiting through Afghanistan and neighbors takes longer to develop. Despite signing the new Afghanistan-Pakistan Transit-Trade Agreement (APTTA) in July 2010, Afghanistan seeks alternative transit routes to have access to seaports, inter alia through Chabahar in Iran.  Membership of Afghanistan to the Transport Corridor of Europe-Caucasus-Asia (TRACECA) is one of our priorities that require support of all participating countries.

Mr. Chairman,

After decades, the reactivation of Afghanistan in TIR convention has recently been completed and TIR system was officially launched in Afghanistan on 4th September 2013. On the other hand, our membership to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UN-CLOS) is under consideration within the government, aiming to benefit from the fundamental rights, including freedom of transit under the framework of the convention.

Substantial progress has been achieved in the accession process of Afghanistan to the World Trade Organization and the government of Afghanistan is willing to conclude this process by the end of 2014.

Afghanistan fully supports the commitment of the landlocked countries to accelerate the implementation of the Almaty Program of Action envisaged in the Vientiane Consensus through effective and genuine partnerships between landlocked and transit countries and their development partners, as well as between the public and private sectors at national, regional and global levels.

Thank you Mr. Chairman.